Recordkeeping


Aria From A Bird Cage

American Singer Canaries 

 

  According to Webster Dictionary:     a-ri-a. (ń΄rēַə), noun,  1. an elaborate melody sung by a single voice    2. a striking solo performance  [Italian, from Latin ǎera, literally means air]

Recordkeeping
 

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American Singers Club, Inc.

Member

 

 

Florida Canary Fanciers

Member

 

National Colorbred Association

Master Breeder Award

 

Keeping good records is an essential part of good Canary management.  I have a computer program to track my flock and breeding activities, but use a paper based system in the bird room and then transcribe the information to the computer program for a permanent record.  Paper based systems are tried and true, having been used in successful breeding programs for years. 

The key here is to have a system and use it.  Keep good, detailed records and keep them up to date.

Some of the sections here contain links to forms I've developed.  You are welcome to print the forms and adapt them for your own birdroom.

 

 

 

Calendar

I keep a calendar on my desk in which I plan and record various things that happen during the year.  This calendar becomes a sort of diary, or journal, that can be compared to previous year's calendars for evaluation of the overall success of the breeding program.

The first thing that goes onto the calendar when I set it up for the new year is the lighting schedule for the birdroom.  I use this for a reference when I am programming my timers each week.  I also record show dates and bird club meeting dates, target dates for setting up pairs, song training schedules, etc.  The note pages in the back of the calendar book are used to record planned pairings for the breeding season, and what the hoped for results of the particular pairings will be.

Linda Hogan, in her book Canary Tales, states that if your program resulted in 85% of your total eggs set being fertile, and 85% of those fertile eggs hatching, and 98% of those hatchlings being raised, you have had a satisfactory breeding season.

As I build on my successes, and learn from my failures, these calendars serve to remind me where I've been and help me plan for the future.

 

 

 

 

Pedigree Form

View Form

This is an informational sheet I have on each of my birdroom's inhabitants.  The form describes the individual bird by band number, color, breeder, and hatch date and has a model to draw out the bird's identifying markings. 

The bottom portion of the form is a traditional "family tree", where the detailed information about the bird's ancestors can be recorded.  The family tree is essential when planning pairings for the breeding season. 

Each block where the bird and its ancestors are identified has enough space to record the Band Number, the bird's Color, and the Breeder's Last Name.  I also make a note beside any block where the particular bird or ancestor was a winner at ASC shows, or notations about traits they are carrying.

                                    Example: 

 

 

 

 

Breeding Cage Card

View Form

This 4x6 card is used during the breeding season, with one card used for each nest.  I print it on a page of card stock, and cut out the individual cards, slipping them into sleeves made from the pages of an inexpensive photo album.  The protected cards are hung on each breeding cage, using a name badge clip that can be purchased at office supply stores.  The name badge clip has a clear plastic loop that snaps easily onto a cage wire, leaving the hinged metal clip dangling. 

As nesting begins and eggs are set, dates are recorded on the card to remind me of when certain events should occur (candling, hatching, banding, etc.).  It also allows for recording the number of  eggs that are set, the number of eggs that are fertile, the number of eggs that hatch, the band numbers of chicks, etc.  You can even note how many chicks are successfully weaned. 

This card has been very helpful to me in being organized, and allows me to record and keep important information which will eventually be transferred into my computer program.  The cards, themselves, would give a breeder good records if kept in a file box.  You could even use a different color of card for different years or family lines if you wanted to color code your records.

 

 

 

Song Evaluation Sheet

View Form

This sheet is used during training of the young males for exhibition.  It is a versatile sheet that can be used two different ways.  One is to record one particular male's progression in song, using the space in the upper right corner to put his band number and the left column to record the various dates you evaluated him.  The second method is to use one sheet to evaluate a group of singers, writing the date of the evaluation in the upper right corner and the bird's band numbers down the left column, making notes about what you hear.

 

 

 

Cage Tags

A handy way to know "who" is "where", or to keep track of which cages need special foods, is to use cage tags. 

Different colored tags can represent different things, such as a certain color indicating certain family lines.  Others can be used to show which cages have breeding pairs, or setting hens, or are feeding chicks.

Notice the yellow tags hanging at the upper left corner of this small flight cage.  These tags were made by cutting rectangles out of a plastic report cover, punching a hole in one end, and cutting a slit to the hole. 

Use a fine line permanent marker to write the inhabitant's band number, coloration, and family line.

If a bird is  moved to a different cage, the tag goes with him/her, and clips onto her new cage.

 Cage tags identify occupants.

Although these home-made tags seemed like a good innovation at the time, I found that some birds were determined to peck and pull at the tags until they were on the floor. 

A closer look at the cage tags.

 

I replaced these yellow home-made tags with a sturdy plastic tile, similar to a bread bag closure, that the birds can't remove.  The new tags are inexpensive and "bird proof"

 

 

 

 

 

 


Copyrightę 2005-2017 Brenda Varhola.  All Rights Reserved.  No portion of this website may be copied without the express written permission of the author.  Contact this site's webmaster.                                          

This page last updated: 01/17/2017                                                                                                               

 

 

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Quick Pick

Here is a Quick Pick Guide to some useful tables, instructions and forms available on this site.

Conversion Table
Pedigree Form
Breeding Cage Card
Singer Evaluation
Bird Swing Plans
Color Pairing Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Aria From A Bird Cage

American Singer Canaries 

 

  According to Webster Dictionary:     a-ri-a. (ń΄rēַə), noun,  1. an elaborate melody sung by a single voice    2. a striking solo performance  [Italian, from Latin ǎera, literally means air]


 

 

American Singers Club, Inc.

Member

 

 

Florida Canary Fanciers

Member

 

National Colorbred Association

Master Breeder Award

 

 

American Singers Club, Inc.

Member

 

Florida Canary Fanciers

Member

 

National Colorbred Association

Master Breeder Award

 

 


Copyrightę 2005-2017 Brenda Varhola.  All Rights Reserved.  No portion of this website may be copied without the express written permission of the author.  Contact this site's webmaster.                                          

This page last updated: 01/31/2017                                                                                                               

 

 

 

 

American Singers Club, Inc.

Member

 

Florida Canary Fanciers

Member

 

National Colorbred Association

Master Breeder Award

 

 


Copyrightę 2005-2017 Brenda Varhola.  All Rights Reserved.  No portion of this website may be copied without the express written permission of the author.  Contact this site's webmaster.                                          

This page last updated: 01/31/2017